World Series

2014 in review in poetry

Photo courtesy New York Times

Photo courtesy New York Times

 

This is the final entry for Designated For Assignment. Coming January 5, 2015, D4A becomes “On the Warning Track”, dedicated to baseball at all levels.  See you there at http://onthewarningtrack.com.

Our Brandon Karsten gives his year in review a poetic twist. Good night to all and to all a good night.

 

By Brandon Karsten

This year started with the crowning of a national champ in Florida State.

When it came time to select Jameis Winston for the game’s MVP, there was no need to hesitate.

This year’s Super Bowl was quite boring.

Seeing Peyton Manning’s Broncos fail miserably reduced all of us to snoring.

 

The Winter Olympics for this year saw Russia playing host.

After two weeks of competing for medals, Russia came away with the most.

From March to April, we saw UConn march from a seventh seed to champions in the Final Four.

With so many exciting finishes, next year we’ll be back screaming for more.

 

With the beginning of spring came another season of baseball,

And with it came the eager anticipation of who will win in the fall.

Before Spring Training, Derek Jeter said the 2014 season would be his last,

And seeing him get the game winning hit in his last Yankee Stadium at-bat was a blast.

 

Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda was caught with something on his neck called pine tar.

And with that stunt he did not go very far.

One pitcher who was dominant this year was Clayton Kershaw.

On his way to the NL Cy Young and MVP, he left all of us in awe.

 

We saw an exciting World Cup in Brazil.

Every minute of soccer action seemed to offer a thrill.

The most talked about incident was Uruguay’s Luis Suarez’s bite,

But Mario Götze’s game-winning goal in the Final showed Germany’s might.

 

In the NBA Finals, the Spurs finally got to the Heat,

Showing the trio of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh can be beat.

It was hard to hear L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling ripping black fans and Magic.

Seeing that racism and prejudice in sports still exists today is quite tragic.

 

LeBron ultimately decided to return home to the Mistake by the Lake,

And we hope to see if a Cleveland title drought will finally break.

In the NHL, the L.A. Kings won Stanley’s Cup with Alec Martinez scoring the game-winner.

In five games, the New York Rangers were done like a TV dinner.

 

The NFL had a PR crisis with Ray Rice punching his then-fiancé Janay.

Rice and Adrian Peterson showed when it came to domestic violence, the NFL was in disarray.

Rest in peace Ralph Wilson, Don Zimmer and Kevin Ward, Jr. and others who died in 2014.

But we can’t forget Tony Gwynn, one of the best sluggers baseball has seen.

 

The person we’ll miss the most is Robin Williams, Giants fan and king of funny.

His wit and humor seemed to turn even the gloomiest of days bright and sunny.

With him gone, in our lives he has left a big gaping hole.

I think what we will miss is what he put into every one of his movies: Soul.

 

Robin would be happy to know that the Giants won the World Series, their third in five years.

But the story was the red-hot Royals who brought K.C. fans a lot of joy and cheers.

Those Royals ran into a pitcher by the nickname of MadBum.

After seeing Madison Bumgarner pitch in the Fall Classic, he left all of us feeling numb.

 

This year for Michigan football was a complete joke.

AD Dave Brandon resigned and the next guy looking for a job was coach Brady Hoke.

With 2015 upcoming, something new called a college football playoff will begin.

Right now it’s hard to predict who will win.

 

Miami Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton signed the biggest contract extension in sports history.

Whether that will help the Marlins make the playoffs in 2015 is only a mystery.

Let’s rejoice in the reason for the season: God sending His son to show us the light.

I say Merry Christmas to you all and to all a good night.

 

Brandon Karsten is a contributor to Designated Four Assignment. He can be found on Facebook or reached through bkarsten2009@hotmail.com.

A Chat With Indians Great Kenny Lofton

Kenny Lofton showing off some of the skills that earned him four Gold Glove Awards.

Kenny Lofton showing off some of the skills that earned him four Gold Glove Awards.

Kenny Lofton enjoyed a successful 17-year Major League career with 11 different organizations. Of course, he is best known as a member of the Cleveland Indians, a team he spent parts of 10 seasons with on four different occasions (1992-1995, 1996, 1998-2001, 2007). His speed and grace helped earn him four Gold Glove Awards and the .299 career hitter was a member of six All-Star teams.

Our Jim Monaghan recently sat down with Lofton to talk about his career in baseball, the World Series, and life after baseball in the film industry.

JM: Just a terrific Major League baseball career that you had Kenny. 17 seasons in the Major Leagues; in the postseason 11 times; in the World Series twice; an Indians Hall of Famer. You had quite the career.

KL: Yeah, it was fun. I had a great time. I mean I enjoyed every minute and the experiences I had with different teams that I played for. And my 2 greatest moments were the World Series (’95 w/Indians, ’02 w/Giants) I played in. They were pretty fun.

JM: The team I associate you most with, of the 11 you played with, is of course the Cleveland Indians. And you played with them for one good chunk of time and then came back with them a few other times. The KC Royals this year, Kenny, remind me an awful lot of that Cleveland Indians team in 1990s. That team you played on, the Indians team, you played on in the 1990s. That Indians team you played on was just so much fun to watch. And the Royals team really recaptured that spirit for me in this postseason. Guys like Lorenzo Cain and Nori Aoki.

KL: Well you know I think we had a combination of pretty much everything. We had speed, defense, we had power…we had it all. We didn’t have the best starters in the world, but we had a team that was very steady, you know we got the job done. We all worked together, and had a great bullpen. We had an all-around great team, but I think our speed and defense stood out and that’s what’s going on with Kansas City. Their speed and defense is standing out right now. When you get in the playoffs, you get on a roll and that’s what Kansas City has done, has gotten on a roll and they have not stopped.

JM: Yeah, sometimes it’s not the best team that wins (the World Series), it’s the team that’s the hottest. And that may be what this San Francisco team is walking into, because this Kansas City Royals team has been incredible.

KL: Oh yeah, they’re (the Giants) in trouble. They (the Royals) have this attitude. They’re very confident in what they’re doing, and what it means for them to play defense and when they get on base they use their speed. There’s no team in baseball that SF has faced this year like this. There’s going to be a rude awakening for them once the process all starts.

JM: Safe to say Kenny that you’re picking Kansas City in this World Series?

KL: I like Kansas City because of that reason. That was my style of play. They’re doing what I liked to do. And baseball had gotten away from all of that because of the steroids and all that. But baseball is back to the way it’s supposed to be. Fun, speed, defense…so you know that’s the reason I’m liking them, because they play my style of game.

JM: You played with a very controversial player in your career, Albert Belle. I actually know somebody who roomed with Albert when he was coming up in the Cleveland system early in his career. He said that Belle was completely misunderstood. Do you think that’s going to keep Albert out of the Hall of Fame?

KL: With the Hall of Fame you don’t know how it’s going to…how they go about the process with the Hall of Fame, because it’s very tricky in who they want in and who they don’t want in. So, I don’t know, I think you know what, your on-field numbers should show up and your “off-field” numbers are in a separate category. Just like Pete Rose. Pete Rose should be in the Hall of Fame

His numbers on the field is what depicts what goes on. What you do a little bit off the field should kind of weigh a little bit, but his numbers are above and beyond anybody I have ever seen ever. So if you’re going to look at it, Pete Rose belongs in the Hall of Fame. But I don’t think, again, with Albert, you can’t look at how someone’s attitude, or what it’s like. Look at Eddie Murray. People complained about Eddie Murray, and he was a first ballot Hall of Famer. So it’s about the numbers. It’s about what you put up in the game. So that’s what the people should look at, not all that other stuff.

JM: You just mentioned about a team getting hot at the right time. We’re at the 10-year anniversary of that 2004 Red Sox team that came back from three games down against the Yankees. You were on that Yankees team. As you were watched those four games unfold after that 19-8 clobbering, what was going through your mind and the mind of your teammates at that point? Could you really believing what was happening as that Red Sox team got hot?

KL: Well I was on the bench. So I felt like I was a guy that should have been on the field and wasn’t. So I was sitting on the bench and it was tough to where I know what it’s like to play in those situations and I felt I should be in the game and I wasn’t.

But you could saw it coming and unfolding, and nothing. And the tough part about the whole thing, I was upset, because there was nothing I could do about it. I wasn’t in the game. That’s what kind of made me feel like I know what I can do and what I could bring to the table. Just watching it unfold and you got your hands are tied and couldn’t do anything about it. Actually, it was a sad feeling for me to sit there and watch it.

JM: Kenny, last week I spoke with Dean Cain (TV’s Lois and Clark) last week about this new movie he’s working on, “My Last Christmas”. There’s an indie funding project that’s tied in with it. What’s your role with this film, with Dean?

KL: I’m good friends with Dean. I brought the project to him from a guy who works with me. I’ve got a company called, “Film Pool” that I’ve had since 2004. The guy that works with me brought the project and said, what do you think of the project? I liked it and took it to Dean and a few other people. It’s a project that I’m very passionate about. You go to indiegogo.com/mylastchristmas and it was a film about a form of a cancer, Myelodysplastic Syndrome  (MDS), that a lot of people don’t know about. It’s very rare and if you’re multi-racial there’s a good chance you could come up with this cancer.

We hooked up with a company called “Project Race”. They’re a company that goes out and tries to get people to register for bone marrow (to donate.) Because you need this type of bone marrow… you’ll need to find a match. We felt very strongly about it. I talked to Dean he was very passionate about it and he liked it, because family members and friends he knows as well, besides me, that are multi-racial. If something was ever to happen and you can’t find that match you’ll feel very sad. When you have that opportunity to go out there and make awareness to this form of cancer and that’s what this film is all about.

JM: And your college degree was actually in film studio production, right, at University of Arizona? And what is the website again for the film.

KL: Yes it was and I had an opportunity to start up my company in 2004 and this is where I am right now. The website is My Last Christmas and you can also go check it out on Twitter.

JM: Best of luck to you and Dean on this film. Thanks Kenny, and continued success to you.

KL: All right, thanks a lot!

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Jim Monaghan can be heard Monday through Friday mornings on the WDHA Morning Jolt from 6-10AM & Sundays from 7-10AM with “All Mixed Up.” He’s also an instructor at Professional Baseball Instruction in Upper Saddle River. Follow him on twitter – @Monaghan21.

Ishikawa’s Blast Solidified Bochy’s Hall Of Fame Entry

Champagne showers or not, Bruce Brochy belongs in Cooperstown.

Champagne showers or not, Bruce Brochy belongs in Cooperstown.

by Drew Sarver

San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy can easily identify with Travis Ishikawa, his sparingly used first baseman. Bochy appeared in just 358 games during a nine-season Major League career. Ishikawa has played in 444 games in his seven-year Major League career. Bochy hit 26 career home runs, while Ishikawa has hit 22 career home runs during the regular season.

But last Thursday night Ishikawa sealed Bochy’s entrance into the Baseball Hall of Fame as a manager. Ishikawa, who played one game with the Yankees last year, struck out twice and was booed off the field, smashed a walkoff three-run home run to give the Giants a 5-2 NL pennant winner over the St. Louis Cardinals. The blast off of St. Louis Cardinals reliever Michael Wacha sent the Giants to their third World Series in the last five years.

The Bochy-led Giants won the championship in 2010 (vs. Texas) and 2012 (vs. Detroit) and will now face the Kansas City Royals, who have become America’s darlings. This is the first time a Bochy squad has made it to the finals as a wild card entrant. Madison Bumgarner pitched a complete game in the Giants 8-0 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the one game NL wild card showdown.

As a player, Bochy was best known for the size of his head. Whenever the Houston Astros, New York Mets, or Padres were on television and Bochy was in the lineup at catcher, the conversation would invariably lead to the larger than normal sized pate atop Bochy’s neck and the custom made batting and catching helmets and cap he needed. Apparently the, reportedly, 8 1/8-size baseball cap holds a lot of brains beneath it. You don’t get to the World Series three times in five seasons merely on talent alone. There’s been plenty of teams with talent that never get to the World Series.

The career .239 hitter was hired to skipper the Padres in 1995, eight years after he had retired as a player. Bochy took over a team that had finished a combined 63 games under .500 with manager Jim Riggleman in 1993-1994 and led them to a 70-74 in his first season, which was shortened by the strike that overlapped from the prior year. A year later, the Padres won 91 and the NL West, and advanced to the playoffs for the first time since the team won the NL pennant in 1984.

They were swept in three games by the Cardinals, losing a one-run game and a pair of two-run games. After a subpar 1997 season, the Pads won 98 games, beat the Astros in the NLDS (4-1), and the Braves in the NLCS (4-2) to capture the second NL pennant in club history. The Padres had the unfortunate task of then going up against the New York Yankees, who had won 114 regular season games. After  blowing a 5-2 lead in Game 1, the Padres were swept by the Yankees in four games.

San Diego didn’t make it back to the playoffs until 2005, where they were swept in the NLDS and lost three of four in the following year’s NLDS as well. After the 2006 season and 12 years at the helm in San Diego, and with one year remaining on his contract, the then-51-year old Bochy decided it was time to move on. The Padres granted permission to the Giants to talk to Bochy about their managerial opening and he agreed to a three-year deal to move to northern California.

The Giants had lost the 2002 World Series to the Angels in seven games, but made the playoffs just once more in the next four seasons under manager Felipe Alou. Bochy kept Alou’s pitching coach Dave Righetti, bullpen coach Mark Gardner, hitting coach Joe Lefebvre, and bench coach Ron Wotus. All four remain in their position today (Lefebvre moved to the front office as a senior advisor and serves as an assistant hitting coach to Hensley Muelens) as does Tim Flannery, who joined Bochy as third base coach in 2007 after having served in the same position for part of Bochy’s time with the Padres.

After 71- and 72-win campaigns, the Giants won 88 games in 2009 and were World Series Champions a year later. Two years later they captured 94 victories and their second title under Bochy. Though he has won only one Manger of the Year Award, he certainly has been deserving of more (perhaps this year he’ll add a second).

Bochy has compiled a 1618-1604 regular season record (18th all time in wins) in 20 Major League seasons, 2 World Series titles so far and four pennants. 12 of the 17 managers that have won more games than Bochy have been elected to the Hall of Fame. Of the five not in the Hall, only Ralph Houk matches Bochy’s two World Series titles. None of the five can match the four pennants that Bochy-led teams have won.

Other than the ’98 Padres, which featured Greg Vaughn, Kevin Brown, Tony Gwynn, and Trevor Hoffman, Bochy’s teams in San Diego were not talent laden. Ownership was more into keeping a low payroll than obtaining/keeping talent. The 2000 San Diego roster was drastically different than the 1998 squad despite just two years between.

Bochy has had more to work with in San Francisco, especially when it comes to the Giants’ pitching staff. He also has an ownership that will spend a little extra money here and there, and a front office, led by GM Brian Sabean, that has done a good job of development of home grown talent.

Whether Bochy wins or loses this year’s “Fall Classic”, he should have already earned his place in Cooperstown.

Perhaps on a larger plaque.

 

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Drew Sarver is the founder, publisher, managing editor, and a contributor for Designated For Assignment. He can be followed on twitter at @mypinstripes and @d4assignment or contacted by email at dsarver@d4assignment.com.