New York Yankees

White Sox Get Melk, Headley Re-Ups With Yankees

The Melkman is back delivering across the border.

The Melkman is back delivering across the border.

The latest free agents are comprised of a player moving on to his sixth team in seven years and one that is staying where he was two-month rental. The Chicago White Sox have been busy this offseason and they continued their re-tooling over the weekend with the free agent signing of outfielder Melky Cabrera. Meanwhile, the New York Yankees agreed, on Monday, with Chase Headley to keep the free agent third baseman for the next four years (at a cost of $52MM).

Cabrera, who played four full seasons with the Yankees, then spent one season in Atlanta, one in Kansas City, one in San Francisco, and two years in Toronto. He’ll replace the lackluster bat of Dayan Viciedo in left field and join newcomers Jeff Samardzija and former Yankees teammate David Robertson on the list of big time acquisitions by GM Kenny Williams.

The Melkman was suspended for 50 games in the second half of the 2012 season due to his involvement in the Biogenesis Clinic scandal. The Giants could have brought him back for the playoffs, but chose not to. With the suspension impacting a new deal, Cabrera signed a two-year, $16MM contract with the Blue Jays prior to the 2013 season. 2014 saw him produce the second best home run (16) and RBI (73) totals of his career.

Cabrera had his best season to date when the Yankees won the 2009 World Series, but he was sent with pitchers Mike Dunn and Arodys Vizcaino to Atlanta for pitchers Javier Vazquez and Boone Logan. The deal was a disaster for both teams. Cabrera produced a .671 OPS with 4 HR and 42 RBI with the Braves. A year later he was a new man, and maybe Biogenesis was the reason.

The then-26-year old put up career numbers in batting average (.305), HR (18), RBI (87), hits (201), and stolen bases (20). With free agency to come after the 2011 season, the Royals dealt Cabrera to San Francisco for pitcher Jonathan Sanchez and Ryan Verdugo.

Headley played his first six-plus seasons with the San Diego Padres until the 2014 trade deadline came around. The Yankees, who had been interested in Headley since his 2012 MVP-like season. (31 HR 115 RBI, .875 OPS, 17 stolen bases) Headley had never approached those caliber numbers before 2012 and has not after. The price to obtain the third baseman was much lower than during or initially after his magical season. The Yankees were able to acquire Headley for rookie infielder Yangervis Solarte and pitcher Rafael De Paula.

While the Yankees’ defense on the left side of the infield has improved drastically with Headley and the two-headed platoon at shortstop with Brendan Ryan and Didi Gregorius, the production of the lineup has not. In fact, it’s gone in the opposite direction.

The move has produced some head scratching, particularly the length of the contract.  A four-year deal based on a very good September after a terrible August. Two months in pinstripes, one good, one bad. It also shows that Headley most likely did not have a four-year, $65MM offer from another team.

The Yankees starting nine hitters, for now, are

1B Mark Teixeira
2B Martin Prado
SS Brendan Ryan/Didi Gregorius
3B Chase Headley
LF Brett Gardner
CF Jacoby Ellsbury
RF Carlos Beltran
C Brian McCann
DH Alex Rodriguez

Not exactly intimidating.

Cashman and Dombrowski Set The Record Straight on Robertson and Scherzer

drob

The Yankees never intended to resign David Robertson once they signed Andrew Miller.

 

New York Yankees GM Brian Cashman and Detroit Tigers GM Dave Dombrowski met with the media at the Winter meetings in San Diego Tuesday afternoon and had something interesting things to say.

Cashman admitted that once the Yankees signed Andrew Miller (four years, $36MM), they had no intention of resigning closer David Robertson, preferring a 2015 draft pick instead. The Yankees never made an official offer to Robertson, who signed a four-year, $46MM deal with the Chicago White Sox. Miller and Dellin Betances will each get a shot to close in the coming season, with manager Joe Girardi using them situationally.

There’s been some speculation that 2014 2nd round pick (from Mississippi St.) Jacob Lindgren could be in the mix, but although he struck out 48 batters in 25 innings, he also walked 13. Lindgren will likely start the season at Double-A Trenton, the highest of the four levels he pitched (and struggled) at this past season, or advanced ‘A’ Tampa.

Dombrowski addressed a statement attributed to the Tigers earlier on Tuesday concerning their free agent starter Max Scherzer. ESPN’s Buster Olney had reported that Scherzer remained a top priority for the Tigers and that they were willing to spend the money necessary to keep him.

Earlier this year, Scherzer had turned down the Tigers six-year offer worth $144MM. This time it was Dombrowski’s turn to do the rejecting.

“I don’t know where he (Olney) got that from,” Dombrowski said. “That’s not accurate. I’m not sure where it comes from, how it comes. I know it didn’t come from this room, but that’s not accurate.”

“The other thing I’ll say is I hope Mr. I (owner Mike Ilitch) didn’t see that,” Dombrowski said, “because he’d be saying, ‘Well, where did that come from?’1

Dombrowski went on to add that starting pitching “was not a priority” and no talks had taken place between the two sides.

 

1 – mlive.com

Starter and Closer: White Sox Obtain Samardzija and Robertson

chi

The Chicago White Sox GM Kenny Williams can’t be blamed if he’s feeling a bit giddy this morning. Last night, Williams started the finalization of a deal that brought starting pitcher Jeff Samardzija from the Oakland A’s and he also came to terms with Yankees closer David Robertson on a four-year, $46MM deal.

Samardzija began last season with the Chicago Cubs, was dealt to the Oakland A’s at the trade deadline, and now returns to Chicago, albeit this time to the south side of the Windy City. Along with the 29-year old right-hander, the A’s sent pitcher Michael Ynoa for infielder Marcus Semien, pitcher Chris Bassitt, 1st baseman Rangel Ravelo, and catcher Josh Phegley.

Samardzija was 2-7 despite a 2.83 ERA in 17 starts for the Cubs before he and Jason Hammel were sent to the west coast for shortstop prospect Addison Russell and two others. The man with the long mullet made 16 stars for Oakland and finished with a 5 and 6 mark despite a 3.16 ERA. The Notre Dame product is in the third year of arbitration eligibility and will be a free agent after the 2015 season. He earned over $5.3MM last season.

Semien played 64 games for the White Sox last season after he had appeared in 21 contests in 2013. He put together a .673 OPS with 28 RBI in 64 games, most of which were played at second base. Baseball America ranked Semien as the 91st best prospect in this past January’s Top 100. Semien, who will be going home (born in San Fran; attended UC-Berkeley) hit 15 HR and drove in 52 runs in 84 games for Triple-A Charlotte. He also  slugged .502 en route to an .881 OPS.

Shortstop has been Semien’s primary position in the minor leagues and that’s where he is slated to play for Oakland after the departure of free agent Jed Lowrie.

Bassitt was a reliever for the University of Akron, but was converted to a starter by Chicago. He’s shown improvement, but it still a work in progress. Phlegley was a first round pick, 38th overall, in the 2009 amateur draft. The 26-year old produced 23 HR and 75 RBI and slugged .861 for Charlotte last season.

He played up with big club for 65 games in 2013, but his OPS was a below par .522. Phegley put up outstanding numbers (.966) in 61 games for Charlotte that same season. With 270 games under his belt at the Triple-A level, Phegley is at the make or break point of his career. He’ll have a shot to at the backup role to Derek Norris.

Know When To Close ‘Em

David Robertson had the best seat in the bullpen school of pitching. The Yankees reliever watched and learned from the best closer in the game, Mariano Rivera, from 2008-2013. Rivera taught Robertson his cutter and more importantly, helped him with the physical and mental aspects of the game.

After averaging 67 appearances from 2010-2013, Robertson became the full-time closer upon Rivera’s retirement. He responded with 39 saves in 44 opportunities and struck out 13.4 batters per nine innings. A first time free agent, Robertson and his agents looked to match the contract Philadelphia had given to Jonathan Papelbon (four years, $50MM) prior to the 2012 season. The Yankees were willing to go four years, but they weren’t willing to part with as much money as even the White Sox were.

With the emergence of set up man Dellin Betances, the free agent signing of Andrew Miller, and the acquistion of Justin Wilson, the Yankees felt Robertson was expendable. Kenny Williams is glad they did.

Dbacks Beat Writer: Gregorius Won’t Hack It In NYC

didig

Arizona Central’s Bob McManaman doesn’t think a former Diamondback will do well in New York. He’s talking, of course, about shortstop Didi Gregorius. The 24-year old, with platoon partner Brendan Ryan, has the unenviable task of replacing Derek Jeter.

Gregorius gets high marks for his glove, but his bat has been awful, particularly against left-handers. According to McManaman, “And it could get even worse. Gregorius is a pleasant and polite young man, but he’s also quiet, introverted and has shown he can be a little mentally fragile when things aren’t going his way.”

“He lets too many things get to him,” an ex-teammate said. “Didi, sometimes he just thinks too much, you know?”

“He always seems to have a lot on his mind,” former manager Kirk Gibson liked to say.1

McManaman goes so far as to say “They’re going to eat him alive in New York.” While it’s an opinion, it’s an unfair statement about a young man who is still trying to find his way at the top level of the game. Perhaps a change of scenery and a different mentor could help to elevate Gregorius’ game.

While not comparing talent or ability, Bernie Williams nearly played his way out of New York at a young age. That changed when the team traded Mel Hall, who was constantly riding the sensitive Williams to the point of distraction. If it had been up to George Steinbrenner, Williams probably would have been dealt. GM Gene Michael was the cooler, better judge of a talent. Just as baseball front offices are better at judging how a player will do rather than a team’s beat writer.

 

1 – azcentral.com

Traded: Yankees Go From DJ to DIDI

didi

The last time the New York Yankees, Detroit Tigers, and Arizona Diamondbacks pulled off a three-team trade (2009) the players involved included Max Scherzer, Curtis Granderson, Austin Jackson, Phil Coke, Daniel Schlereth, Ian Kennedy, and Edwin Jackson. The names weren’t as sexy this time around when the three teams agreed to a deal earlier Friday.

The Yankees, looking for a shortstop to replace their future Hall-of-Fame inductee, Derek Jeter, picked up the underwhelming Didi Gregorious from the Diamondbacks. The Tigers received gritty starter Shane Greene from the Yankees and the Diamonbacks got pitcher Robbie Ray and infielder Domingo Leyba.

This one is a head scratcher for fans of both the Yankees and the Tigers. The Diamondbacks clearly did not believe that Greene was worth taking straight up  for Gregorious. The Tigers felt Greene was worth sending two players to the Diamondbacks. And the Yankees already have a good glove, can’t hit shortstop in Brendan Ryan. (UPDATE – Cashman was on WFAN and said that Gregorius, who struggles against left-handers, will platoon with Ryan.)

Replacing Jeter is an unenviable task for anyone, but should Yankees GM Brian Cashman get someone who is better suited to play every day (or platoon)? Gregorius was signed as teenager by the Cincinnati Reds in 2007. Nearly a year ago today, he was part of another three team deal, one that involved the Cleveland Indians and the Diamondbacks.

Arizona sent pitchers Trevor Bauer, Bryan Shaw, and Matt Albers to Cleveland, who also received utility man Drew Stubbs from Cincy. The Reds also sent Gregorious to the desert with Cleveland sending 1B/OF Lars Anderson and reliever Tony Sipp to the same destination. The Indians sent of outfielder Shin-Soo Choo and infielder Jason Donald to the Reds.

Gregorious got an eight-game call up for the Reds in 2012, but played 103 games in his rookie season the following year with the Diamondbacks. His numbers were decent for a light hitting newbie – a .252/.332/.373 slash line – however, his sophomore year went in the wrong direction. The 24-year old put up a .226/.290/.363 line in 80 games.

Prior to the 2013 season, Baseball America had Gregorious as their 80th best prospect out of their top 100 and MLB.com had him rated at number 63. The ranking were based on the 2012 minor league season that Gregorious split between Double-A (81 games) and Triple-A (48 games). The native of the Netherlands had a combined .717 OPS with 7 HR and 54 RBI in 129 games. He slugged .393 by adding 21 doubles and 11 triples.

The shortstop, who has also played some second base, has worked hard on his defense. He committed 32 errors in the minors in 2010, but had 13 for the Diamonbacks in 2013, and six last year. The Yankees are taking a low risk here in what they gave up, but are taking a big gamble on Gregorius showing an improved bat for a team desparately in need of run production. For now, Gregorius seems like the next Bubba Crosby.

Greene was a pleasant surprise as 25-year old rookie that was forced into the rotation due to injuries to CC Sabathia, Masahiro Tanaka, Ivan Nova, and Michael Pineda. The Yankees had selected Greene in the 9th round of the 2009 MLB Amateur draft out of Daytona Beach (FL) Community College.

Greene won four of his first five decisions, tossing 7.1 shutout innings against the Baltimore Orioles, and eight scoreless frames against the Tigers. He beat the Tigers a second time three weeks later after he allowed two earned runs in seven innings. Perhaps his shaky five starts in September convinced the Yankees to deal Greene while there was still a market for him. Apparently those two wins over Detroit convinced the Tigers he was worth it.

Greene finished the season 5-4, 3.78 with 9.3 Ks per nine innings and eight home runs allowed in 78.2 innings pitched.  With the uncertainty of the health of the starting rotation, Yankees fans better hope Cashman is swinging a deal for a pitcher or signing one of the big time free agents.

The acquisition of Ray by the Diamondbacks is an interesting one. The 23-year old is still somewhat of an unknown commodity. He made six starts and three relief appearances for the Tigers this past season and was roughed up, though he was impressive in his first two starts (11.1 IP, 1 ER 7 K). The 6’2″ left-hander was selected by the Washington Nationals in the 12th round of the 2010 draft and was traded to Detroit last December as part of a package to get Doug Fister.

Ray averaged better than 10 Ks per nine innings in a 2013 season that was split between Advanced A’ Potomac (Carolina League) and Double-A Harrisburg (Eastern League). Perhaps it was the trip to the Majors, but Ray wasn’t as effective last season at either Triple-A Toledo or with Detroit.

Leyba just turned 19 in September and had an impressive 30 games (.914 OPS) stint for Western Michigan in the Midwest League, after a rough 37 games in the New York-Penn League.

Signed: Yankees Get Their Miller

Andrew-Miller1[1]

Andrew Miller’s career looked like it was over. The former 6th overall pick (Detroit) in the 2006 draft was derailed by injuries and ineffectivness. Then things suddenly turned around him for as a lefty specialist with the Boston Red Sox in 2012. It paid off for him today. The YES Network’s Jack Curry reported that the New York Yankees and Miller agreed on a four-year, $36MM contract.

The Yankees did not want to go to four years, but compromised once they were able to reduce the yearly average. Miller had reportedly been seeking $10MM per season. The Yankees have struggled to find a consistent left-hander out of the pen for the last decade. Guys like Boone Logan had some good streaks, but would often fail at the worst possible time.

Miller’s bust out season saw him strike out 11.4 batters per nine innings. He appeared in just 37 games in 2013 due to foot surgery, but saw his Ks/nine innings increase to 14.1. Last season, with Boston and Baltimore, he set personal bests with 62.1 IP, 14.9 Ks/nine innings, and a 0.802 WHIP. Good timing for a great contract.

Even with Miller signed, the Yankee cannot leave their bullpen as is. The team had a superb 1-2 punch at the back end of games last year as Dellin Betances emerged as a power right-handed set up man and David Robertson excelled as the closer that replaced Mariano Rivera. Robertson, as of this writing, is an unsigned free agent. Miller’s acquisition will strengthen the bullpen, but only if they resign Robertson or an equivalent. It would be a huge mistake to turn away Robertson if he wants four years after giving Miller four years, even if it’s likely to cost the Yankees an additional $50-$52MM.

Despite Miller’s numbers, Robertson is the better pitcher and it shouldn’t be assumed that Betances can step into the closer’s role.

 

Rumors Flying As Winter Meetings Approach

Headley

You would be fired up too if someone offered you more than $16MM a year.

Baseball’s Winter meetings will convene in San Diego this weekend…SoCal in December vs Northeast in December…sigh…’nuff said. A number of rumors concerning free agents and possible trades have been floated out there as the weekend approaches.

The latest is a reported (by Yahoo Sports’ Jeff Passan) four-year, $65MM offer for free agent third baseman Chase Headley. No matter how much the owners complain, they still make ridiculous offers and this is certainly one. Headley, who has a fabulous glove, has not been productive at the plate since his one huge year that made baseball stand up and take notice.

Maybe it was fear that the Mayans would be right, but Headley hit in 2012 like his life depended on it. The Padres third baseman hit 31 home runs, had 115 RBI, and an .875 OPS. Numbers that Headley has not approached before or after 2012. Prior to his trade to the Yankees at this past season’s deadline, Headley had a .651 OPS in 77 games with San Diego. In 58 games for the Bronx Bombers, Headley had a respectable .768 OPS, but he was a non-factor in August before a hot streak in September gave him decent numbers, in a small sample (58 games), in pinstripes.

The Yankees made the mistake of giving Ichiro Suzuki a two year deal after one hot month in 2012. While Headley is much younger than the Ichiro, he has nowhere near the Hall of Fame career the Yankees gambled on when they gave Ichiro a new contract prior to the 2013 season. Headley seems like a good guy and flashes the leather with the best of them, but I would not be happy if that four-year, $65M deal was offered by a team I was a fan of.

Lester nearing a decision?

CSNNE.com’s Sean McAdam reported on Wednesday that free agent pitcher Jon Lester was “likely” to make a decision on his future by the end of the week. Why McAdam felt that way remains to be seen – is this from a source or sources, or a hunch? – but there are reportedly four teams in on the bidding.

FoxSports’ Ken Rosenthal stated Wednesday evening that the Los Angeles Dodgers were making a late, hard push for Lester’s services. The Chicago Cubs had reportedly made Lester a six-year, $138MM offer on Tuesday. The Boston Red Sox, who Lester played for in parts of nine seasons before his deadline deal to Oakland, and the San Francisco Giants are the other two teams trying to sign the lefty. (It’s still a mystery how the New York Yankees have not been involved since a relatively young left-handed pitcher is always a need in the Bronx.)

Speaking of the A’s, they are reportedly shopping Brandon Moss, who had offseason hip surgery. Moss, once touted as a prospect, floundered in the Major Leagues until he arrived in Oakland. He had 21 HR and 52 RBI in a little more than half a season in 2012 and followed that up with 30-87 and 25-81 the last two seasons as a first baseman and outfielder. He was selected to his first All-Star team in 2014.

In his second year of arbitration eligibility Moss would get a bump from the $4.1MM he earned last season. The kind of money that does not fits into GM Billy Beane’s budget.

Jays and Mariners Swap Players

The deal that took place Wednesday night between the Toronto Blue Jays and Seattle Mariners flew under the radar, but could have a fairly significant impact on both teams. Seattle sent outfielder Michael Saunders to Toronto for left-handed starter J.A. Happ.

Saunders missed 1-1/2 months of baseball due to a strained oblique, which was unfortunate since he was arguably having his best season in the Majors. He finished with a career-best .791 OPS and had 8 HR and 34 RBI in 78 games. With Jose Bautista entrenched in right field, Saunders will slide over to left field to replace Melky Cabrera. GM Alex Anthopoulos made the move knowing that the Melkman preferred not to return to Toronto.

It’s the third time that Happ has been traded, with his value diminished in each deal. He was part of a package that the Philadelphia Phillies sent to the Houston Astros for Roy Oswalt at the 2010 trade deadline. He was part of a deadline deal again two years later, when Houston sent him, and pitchers Brandon Lyon and Dan Carpenter to Toronto for outfielder Ben Francisco, reliever Francisco Cordero, and five minor leaguers.

Happ made 26 starts and four relief appearances for the Blue Jays last season and finished with an 11-11, 4.22 record. He struck out 7.6 batters per nine innings, which was down nearly 1.5 strikeouts since 2012. Happ made just 18 starts in 2013 after being struck in the head by a comebacker off the bat of Tampa’s Desmond Jennings.

So if Happ is to start, who does he replace? Seattle’s rotation, prior to the deal, consisted of Felix Hernandez, Hisashi Iwakuma, James Paxton, Taijuan Walker, and Roenis Elias. Paxton was limited to 17 starts – 13 with the Mariners, four in the minors – after undergoing left shoulder surgery in October, 2013, but he’s still highly thought of. There have been rumors that Seattle was shopping Iwakuma, but GM Jack Zduriencik flatly denied that was the case.

Taijuan Walker was the 43rd overall pick in the 2010 draft and is one of the top prospects in baseball. That leaves Elias, who was a surprise rookie success in 2014. In 29 starts, the Cuban-born right-hander struck out 7.6 hitters per nine innings pitched, gave up less than a hit per inning and put together a respectable 3.85 ERA. He finished 10-12 three years after the Mariners signed him as a free agent.

Rumor: D-Rob Has 3 Year, $39MM Offer

drob

David Robertson had the opportunity to be the heir apparent to Mariano Rivera, who retired after the 2013 regular season. “D-Rob” took full advantage as the new New York Yankees closer, with 39 saves and better than 13 strikeouts per nine innings. A fine season when your about to embark on free agency as well.

CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Sunday evening that Robertson has a three-year, $39MM offer in hand. The team that made the offer remains unknown at this time. The Yankees definitely want Robertson back and don’t consider set up man Dellin Betances ready to assume the job. In fact, it would not be surprising if the Yankees signed another closer to a short term deal for when, and if, Betances is ready to assume the 9th inning role.

Heyman and Designated For Assignment agree that the Yankees won’t offer Robertson a guaranteed fourth year, but a three year deal would probably be in the range of $40MM – $50MM. The amount would surpass the $12.5MM average per year of the four year deal Jonathan Papelbon signed with the Philadelphia Phillies prior to the 2012 season.

Earlier D4A reported that the San Diego Padres were talking to the Los Angeles Dodgers about outfielder Matt Kemp. According to FoxSports’ Ken Rosenthal the Baltimore Orioles have also talked turkey with the Dodgers. The Orioles have free agent outfielders in Nelson Cruz and Nick Markakis that would “only” cost them money rather than the players they would have to give up to land Kemp.

The NY Media has found a new target – Derek Jeter

By Jim Monaghan

The final week of the regular season played out like a Hollywood script for Derek Jeter. First came the walkoff single against the Orioles in his final game in Yankee Stadium, and then came the three-day lovefest in, of all places, Boston’s Fenway Park where the Yankee legend was greeted with the kind of cheers and “DER-EK JEE-TER” chants usually reserved for Yankees home games.

Photo courtesy Getty Images

Photo courtesy Getty Images

From the moment back in February when Jeter announced his retirement via a post on his Facebook page – “First of all, everyone said they didn’t even know I had a Facebook page” – the tributes came pouring in. The cynics started to wonder if Jeter was being credited with inventing and/or saving the game of baseball.

The final weekend in Boston was positively surreal. Sure, there were Yankees fans everywhere, but there were also a lot of Red Sox fans leading those cheers. Gone were the days of the “Nomar’s better” chants…heck, Jeter and the rest of us might have even forgotten about the “Pokey’s better” days of 2004.

And then came October 1.

The guy who had been so reserved in his comments to the media – has any player ever use so many words in a post-game interview to really say so little? – was now offering athletes a chance to speak out, albeit in a highly-controlled manner. “I do think fans deserve more than ‘no comments’ or ‘I don’t knows.'” Jeter was “in the process of building a place where athletes have the tools they need to share what they really think and feel. We want to have a way to connect directly with our fans, with no filter.”

David Waldstein’s article in The New York Times revealed that “The website will have editorial oversight. Gary Hoenig, a former editorial director of ESPN Publishing and an editor of ESPN the Magazine, will be the editorial director. The website will be backed financially, in part, by Thomas Tull, whose production company was behind ’42,’ a film about Jackie Robinson.”

Cue the media backlash. Writers who’d spent the better part of the past two decades singing Jeter’s praises suddenly had their opening, and they ran with it.

John Harper from the New York Daily News offered this.

Steve Politi from the Newark Star Ledger was equally miffed.

Politi explained his lack of enthusiasm for Jeter’s venture saying, “Here’s my problem: After a lifetime spent guarding every detail, big and small, about his life it’s a tad hypocritical to ask current athletes to bare their souls on his website. What’s next? Joe Girardi encouraging other managers to throw out their research and just ‘go with their gut?'”

The crowning touch came from New York Daily News sports columnist Mike Lupica.

Lupica’s column contained a couple of not-so-veiled very crude references to female anatomy that were, among other things, completely devoid of the class that Jeter showed throughout his career.

Jeter’s been seemingly EVERYWHERE lately. An appearance on the Today Show, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, and an online twitter chat of all things.

And Jeter Publishing is off to a roaring start.

Derek Jeter came into professional baseball with a plan – play the game the right way, and don’t give the media a reason to take something you say and run with it. He’s clearly treating the next step in his professional life with another carefully laid-out plan. That Players’ Tribune twitter page and website were registered in November 2011; the domain for his Jeter Publishing website was also set up about a year ago. He managed to fly completely under the radar with both until he decided to make it public.

We all know that any content published by athletes via Jeter’s site (Russell Wilson is the first to contribute something) is going to be heavily edited. Big freaking deal. The media backlash – less than 72 hours after Jeter’s career came to a close – is ridiculous and can be summed up in four words.

Leave DJ Alone

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Jim Monaghan can be heard Monday through Friday mornings on the WDHA Morning Jolt from 6-10AM & Sundays from 7-10AM with “All Mixed Up.” He’s also an instructor at Professional Baseball Instruction in Upper Saddle River. Follow him on twitter – @Monaghan21.

A Red Sox fan’s farewell to Derek Jeter

By Jim Monaghan

If you’ve listened to me on the radio for any amount of time, you know I’m not a fan of the New York Yankees. Red Sox executive Larry Luchino dubbed them the “Evil Empire” some years back; I’ve been known to say things far less complimentary.

Photo courtesy Reuters

Photo courtesy Reuters

Derek Jeter‘s Hall-of-Fame career will come to an end Sunday afternoon at Fenway Park in what will otherwise be a completely meaningless baseball game for both the Yankees and the Red Sox.

Both teams are out of the playoffs, and the lineups for the two previous games of this series have looked like something you’d see in the late innings of a mid-March spring training game when the starters have long since left the field and showered.

Red Sox principal owner John Henry put Friday night’s lineup into perspective with an all-too-appropriate seven-word tweet.

So with all that said, allow me to get the snark out of the way first.

I agree with much of what Keith Olbermann said this past week about Derek Jeter. In case you somehow managed to miss what Olbermann said, go here and here.

Derek Jeter isn’t going to go down in baseball history as the “Greatest Yankee of All Time.” There are at least five ahead of him you may have actually heard of – Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, Mantle, Berra. I’d even go so far as to offer up Don Mattingly as a better-than-Jeter candidate. You may have some others as well to throw into the mix.

Derek Jeter isn’t the “Greatest Yankee Shortstop of All Time.” That Rizzuto character was pretty good, you know.

And for awhile, you could make the argument that Derek Jeter wasn’t even the best shortstop on his own team once that Alex Rodriguez fellow – remember him? – joined the Yankees.

Photo courtesy New York Times

Photo courtesy New York Times

Team leader? It was blatantly obvious that Jeter didn’t make Rodriguez’s transition to New York any easier. Truth be told, given my own feelings about Rodriguez I probably would have done the same thing, but as I said right from the start, this is the snarky part.

Team player? One could argue that the Captain could have and should have gone to manager Joe Girardi any number of times this year and asked to be moved out of the two-hole in the lineup as it became painfully evident that he wasn’t producing well enough to be in the first third of the order.

Photo courtesy Associated Press

Photo courtesy Associated Press

And don’t even get me started on the whole “Derek Jeter Farewell Tour sponsored by Steiner Sports.” My first thought on Thursday night when Jeter’s teammates dumped a bucket of Gatorade (with the “2” in place of the usual logo) on him was, “Wonder how much Steiner will be charging for THAT jersey?”

Don’t get me wrong – I’m a big fan of capitalism, and I’ve never once begrudged an athlete his mega-contract. But these last two weeks of the season have been more like a QVC Network production than a final well-deserved victory lap for a player of Jeter’s stature. Anyone want to buy a rake?

The “flip” play against Oakland in the playoffs? I don’t care how many times Joe Torre makes the claim, but I refuse to believe that the Yankees actually practiced that play. One could make the argument that the Captain was actually out of position. And if Jeremy Giambi had slid…. But I digress.

Photo courtesy Associated Press

Photo courtesy Associated Press

That playoff home run against the Orioles in 1996? It would clearly have been overturned under the current replay rules.

Photo courtesy New York Times

Photo courtesy New York Times

The patented jump throw? I’m old enough to remember a guy named Bobby Wine making similar plays for the Phillies back in the mid-60’s. But again, I digress.

Mr. November? As a Red Sox fan, I’ll always have Jetes’ performance in Games 4 through 7 of the 2004 American League Championship Series to look back on.

** SNARK OVER **

Derek Jeter will play the last game of his Hall-of-Fame career Sunday afternoon at Fenway Park. It will cap off what has been a three-day love fest from Red Sox fans. And while details haven’t been announced, you just know that Red Sox Executive Vice President Dr. Charles Steinberg and his staff will be pulling out all the stops to honor Jeter. And deservedly so.

Photo courtesy MLB.com

Photo courtesy MLB.com

Plain and simple, Derek Jeter is everything I want a baseball player to be. And yes, he played hard…and he stayed cool.

He respected his teammates, his opponents, and more importantly, the Game of Baseball. In the PED era of players routinely putting up video game numbers, Jeter’s name was never on the list of the usual suspects, even as some of his own teammates treated the clubhouse like a chemistry lab.

He battled his way through each and every at bat of his career. He may never have put up enough league-leading numbers to satisfy the likes of the Keith Olbermanns of the world, but he certainly had his share of big base hits, and I lost count of how many of those came at the expense of the Red Sox over the years. Derek Jeter could beat you with his bat, his glove, and his legs. And as someone who probably watched or listened to 90% of Jeter’s career, I can say with confidence that he never stopped trying to beat the opponent no matter what the score was.

For years, I led the “if he played anywhere other than New York he’d be considered just another very good player” crowd when it came to assessing Captain Intangibles. But as the final weeks of Jeter’s career have unfolded, I’ve started to appreciate Jeter in a whole new way. I’ve also discovered a sense of melancholy that I wasn’t expecting.

Some of that came from knowing that Jeter is going through that phase of his life as described by Jackie Robinson when he said, “Athletes die twice.” Derek Jeter’s athletic mortality is playing out in front of our eyes. In many ways, I think it’s reminding me of my own mortality.

Photo courtesy New York Times

Photo courtesy New York Times

The image of Jeter heading out to shortstop once last time following Thursday night’s game and crouching down with his hands covering his face, clearly filled with emotion, is one that will stay for me forever. Jeter said more in that moment about his love for the game he played so eloquently for nearly 20 years than he could have said in a month of post-game press conferences.

My 13-year old son wants to play baseball for a living. It’s all he talks about. Like any of the tens of thousands of kids who call themselves Red Sox fans, he wants to call Fenway Park “home” some day, and he absolutely despises the Yankees.

Photo courtesy New York Times

Photo courtesy New York Times

But when Jeter dropped that single into right field in the final home game of his career to drive in the winning run against the Orioles, my son found himself filled with emotions he wasn’t expecting for the only Yankees shortstop he’s ever seen in his brief lifetime. “This is really the end of an era,” he said in one of those moments that may be the first time he’s felt a part of his own childhood dying.

Derek-Jeter-nephew-tips-capSo yes, Keith Olbermann and Derek Jeter’s naysayers may indeed have a lot of valid points. And I warn you now that we’re going to deal with the whole over-the-top Jeter Love Fest again in five years when Cooperstown surely comes calling.

But this Red Sox fan is also hopefully objective enough to acknowledge one of the all-time greats.

#RE2PECT, indeed.

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Jim Monaghan can be heard Monday through Friday mornings on the WDHA Morning Jolt from 6-10AM & Sundays from 7-10AM with “All Mixed Up.” He’s also an instructor at Professional Baseball Instruction in Upper Saddle River. Follow him on twitter – @Monaghan21.